Avon-by-the-Sea, New Jersey
Borough
Borough of Avon-by-the-Sea
Map of Avon-by-the-Sea in Monmouth County. Inset: Location of Monmouth County highlighted in the State of New Jersey.
Map of Avon-by-the-Sea in Monmouth County. Inset: Location of Monmouth County highlighted in the State of New Jersey.
Census Bureau map of Avon-by-the-Sea, New Jersey
Census Bureau map of Avon-by-the-Sea, New Jersey
Coordinates: 40°11′29″N 74°00′54″W / 40.191418°N 74.015105°W / 40.191418; -74.015105Coordinates: 40°11′29″N 74°00′54″W / 40.191418°N 74.015105°W / 40.191418; -74.015105[1][2]
Country United States
State New Jersey
County Monmouth
Incorporated March 23, 1900
Government[5]
   Type Walsh Act
   Mayor Robert Mahon (term ends April 30, 2015)[3]
   Administrator / Clerk Timothy M. Gallagher[4]
Area[2]
   Total 0.541 sq mi (1.403 km2)
   Land 0.426 sq mi (1.104 km2)
   Water 0.115 sq mi (0.298 km2)  21.27%
Area rank 545th of 566 in state
47th of 53 in county[2]
Elevation[6] 10 ft (3 m)
Population (2010 Census)[7][8][9]
   Total 1,901
   Estimate (2012[10]) 1,913
   Rank 491st of 566 in state
41st of 53 in county[11]
   Density 4,459.1/sq mi (1,721.7/km2)
   Density rank 132nd of 566 in state
13th of 53 in county[11]
Time zone Eastern (EST) (UTC-5)
   Summer (DST) Eastern (EDT) (UTC-4)
ZIP code 07717[12][13]
Area code(s) 732[14]
FIPS code 3402502440[15][2][16]
GNIS feature ID 0885147[17][2]
Website www.avonbytheseanj.com

Avon-by-the-Sea (often called simply Avon) is a borough in Monmouth County, New Jersey, United States, As of the 2010 United States Census, the borough's population was 1,901,[7][8][9] reflecting a decline of 343 (-15.3%) from the 2,244 counted in the 2000 Census, which had in turn increased by 79 (+3.6%) from the 2,165 counted in the 1990 Census.[18] The borough's name is pronounced Ah-von (not Ay-von).[19]

Avon-by-the-Sea was incorporated as a borough by an Act of the New Jersey Legislature on March 23, 1900, from portions of Neptune City.[20]

Geography

The boardwalk of Avon-by-the-Sea

Avon-by-the-Sea is located at 40°11′29″N 74°00′54″W / 40.191418°N 74.015105°W / 40.191418; -74.015105 (40.191418,-74.015105). According to the United States Census Bureau, the borough had a total area of 0.541 square mile (1.403 km2), of which, 0.426 square mile (1.104 km2) of it is land and 0.115 square mile (0.298 km2) of it (21.27%) is water.[2][1]

Demographics

Historical population
Census Pop. %
1910 426
1920 647 51.9%
1930 1,220 88.6%
1940 1,211 0.7%
1950 1,650 36.3%
1960 1,707 3.5%
1970 2,163 26.7%
1980 2,337 8.0%
1990 2,165 7.4%
2000 2,244 3.6%
2010 1,901 15.3%
Est. 2012 1,913 [10] 0.6%
Population sources: 1910-1920[21]
1910[22] 1910-1930[23]
1930-1990[24] 2000[25][26] 2010[7][8][9]

Census 2010

At the 2010 United States Census, there were 1,901 people, 901 households, and 476.6 families residing in the borough. The population density was 4,459.1 per square mile (1,721.7 /km2). There were 1,321 housing units at an average density of 3,098.6 per square mile (1,196.4 /km2). The racial makeup of the borough was 96.95% (1,843) White, 0.32% (6) Black or African American, 0.00% (0) Native American, 0.63% (12) Asian, 0.00% (0) Pacific Islander, 1.26% (24) from other races, and 0.84% (16) from two or more races. Hispanics or Latinos of any race were 3.73% (71) of the population.[7]

There were 901 households of which 17.1% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 41.7% were married couples living together, 8.8% had a female householder with no husband present, and 47.1% were non-families. 40.8% of all households were made up of individuals and 17.8% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.11 and the average family size was 2.94.[7]

In the borough, 16.8% of the population were under the age of 18, 6.9% from 18 to 24, 19.5% from 25 to 44, 32.8% from 45 to 64, and 23.9% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 49.1 years. For every 100 females there were 89.5 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 83.5 males.[7]

The Census Bureau's 2006-2010 American Community Survey showed that (in 2010 inflation-adjusted dollars) median household income was $83,333 (with a margin of error of +/- $10,008) and the median family income was $113,750 (+/- $18,599). Males had a median income of $56,635 (+/- $32,033) versus $58,300 (+/- $5,223) for females. The per capita income for the borough was $58,063 (+/- $6,550). About 1.1% of families and 3.8% of the population were below the poverty line, including 0.0% of those under age 18 and 2.1% of those age 65 or over.[27]

Census 2000

As of the 2000 United States Census[15] there were 2,244 people, 1,043 households, and 535 families residing in the borough. The population density was 5,262.9 people per square mile (2,014.9/km2). There were 1,387 housing units at an average density of 3,253.0 per square mile (1,245.4/km2). The racial makeup of the borough was 97.15% White, 0.53% African American, 0.45% Native American, 0.89% Asian, 0.62% from other races, and 0.36% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 2.41% of the population.[25][26]

As of the 2000 Census, 36.5% of Avon-by-the-Sea residents were of Irish ancestry, the third-highest percentage of any municipality in the United States, and second-highest in New Jersey, among all places with more than 1,000 residents identifying their ancestry.[28]

There were 1,043 households out of which 18.6% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 42.8% were married couples living together, 6.4% had a female householder with no husband present, and 48.7% were non-families. 41.1% of all households were made up of individuals and 18.5% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.15 and the average family size was 3.04.[25][26]

In the borough the population was spread out with 18.4% under the age of 18, 4.8% from 18 to 24, 28.7% from 25 to 44, 25.8% from 45 to 64, and 22.3% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 44 years. For every 100 females there were 93.4 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 87.4 males.[25][26]

The median income for a household in the borough was $60,192, and the median income for a family was $80,605. Males had a median income of $53,125 versus $35,857 for females. The per capita income for the borough was $41,238. About 2.3% of families and 2.7% of the population were below the poverty line, including 3.0% of those under age 18 and 4.4% of those age 65 or over.[25][26]

Government

Local government

Avon-by-the-Sea has governed under the Walsh Act since 1919, by a three-member commission.[29] Members of the commission are elected at-large in nonpartisan elections to serve four-year terms of office on a concurrent basis.[5]

As of 2013, members of the Avon-by-the-Sea Commission are Mayor Robert Mahon (Commissioner of Revenue and Finance), Francis Gorman (Commissioner of Public Affairs and Public Safety) and Robert P. McGovern (Commissioner of Public Works, Parks and Public Property).[30][31]

Federal, state and county representation

Avon-by-the-Sea is located in the 4th Congressional district[32] and is part of New Jersey's 30th state legislative district.[8][33][34] Prior to the 2011 reapportionment following the 2010 Census, Avon-by-the-Sea had been in the 11th state legislative district.[35] Prior to the 2010 Census, Avon-by-the-Sea had been part of the 6th Congressional District, a change made by the New Jersey Redistricting Commission that took effect in January 2013, based on the results of the November 2012 general elections.[35]

New Jersey's Fourth Congressional District is represented by Christopher Smith (R).[36] New Jersey is represented in the United States Senate by Cory Booker (D, Newark; took office on October 31, 2013, after winning a special election to fill the seat of Frank Lautenberg)[37][38] and Bob Menendez (D, North Bergen).[39][40]

The 30th District of the New Jersey Legislature is represented in the State Senate by Robert Singer (R, Lakewood Township) and in the General Assembly by Sean T. Kean (R, Wall Township) and Dave Rible (R, Wall Township).[41] The Governor of New Jersey is Chris Christie (R, Mendham Township).[42] The Lieutenant Governor of New Jersey is Kim Guadagno (R, Monmouth Beach).[43]

Monmouth County is governed by a Board of Chosen Freeholders consisting of five members who are elected at-large to serve three year terms of office on a staggered basis, with either one or two seats up for election each year as part of the November general election. At an annual reorganization meeting held in the beginning of January, the board selects one of its members to serve as Director and another as Deputy Director.[44] As of 2014, Monmouth County's Freeholders are Freeholder Director Lillian G. Burry (R, Colts Neck Township; term ends December 31, 2014),[45] Freeholder Deputy Director Gary J. Rich, Sr. (R, Spring Lake; 2014),[46] Thomas A. Arnone (R, Neptune City; 2016),[47] John P. Curley (R, Middletown Township; 2015)[48] and Serena DiMaso (R, Holmdel Township; 2016).[49][50] Constitutional officers elected on a countywide basis are County Clerk M. Claire French (Wall Township),[51] Sheriff Shaun Golden (Farmingdale)[52] and Surrogate Rosemarie D. Peters (Middletown Township).[53]

Politics

As of March 23, 2011, there were a total of 1,465 registered voters in Avon-by-the-Sea, of which 379 (25.9%) were registered as Democrats, 415 (28.3%) were registered as Republicans and 670 (45.7%) were registered as Unaffiliated. There was one voter registered to another party.[54]

In the 2008 presidential election, Republican John McCain received 57.2% of the vote here (680 cast), ahead of Democrat Barack Obama with 40.4% (480 votes) and other candidates with 0.8% (9 votes), among the 1,189 ballots cast by the borough's 1,520 registered voters, for a turnout of 78.2%.[55] In the 2004 presidential election, Republican George W. Bush received 61.5% of the vote here (759 ballots cast), outpolling Democrat John Kerry with 37.2% (459 votes) and other candidates with 0.2% (3 votes), among the 1,234 ballots cast by the borough's 1,605 registered voters, for a turnout percentage of 76.9.[56]

In the 2009 gubernatorial election, Republican Chris Christie received 64.1% of the vote here (583 ballots cast), ahead of Democrat Jon Corzine with 29.6% (269 votes), Independent Chris Daggett with 5.1% (46 votes) and other candidates with 0.4% (4 votes), among the 909 ballots cast by the borough's 1,484 registered voters, yielding a 61.3% turnout.[57]

Education

The Avon School District serves public school students in kindergarten through eighth grade. Avon Elementary School served an enrollment of 161 students during the 2010-11 school year.[58]

For ninth through twelfth grades, public school students attend either Asbury Park High School or Manasquan High School, as part of a sending/receiving relationships with the respective districts, based on the results of a lottery under which 62.5% of students are sent to Manasquan and 37.5% to Asbury Park.[59][60]

The Manasquan school also serves students from Belmar, Brielle, Lake Como, Sea Girt, Spring Lake, Spring Lake Heights who attend as part of sending/receiving relationships with their respective districts.[61][62]

Students may also apply to academy schools in the Monmouth County Vocational School District, which include the Academy of Allied Health & Science, Biotechnology High School, High Technology High School, Marine Academy of Science and Technology and Communications High School.[63] Students also have the option to attend Academy Charter High School in Lake Como, which accepts students on a lottery basis from the communities of Allenhurst, Asbury Park, Avon-by-the-Sea, Belmar, Bradley Beach, Deal, Interlaken and Lake Como.[64][65]

References

  1. ^ a b "US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990". United States Census Bureau. 2011-02-12. Retrieved 2011-04-23. 
  2. ^ a b c d e f Gazetteer of New Jersey Places, United States Census Bureau. Accessed June 6, 2013.
  3. ^ 2013 New Jersey Mayors Directory, New Jersey Department of Community Affairs. Accessed May 12, 2013.
  4. ^ Avon Borough Administrative Office, Avon-by-the-Sea Borough. Accessed July 29, 2012.
  5. ^ a b 2012 New Jersey Legislative District Data Book, Rutgers University Edward J. Bloustein School of Planning and Public Policy, March 2013, p. 58.
  6. ^ U.S. Geological Survey Geographic Names Information System: Borough of Avon-by-the-Sea, Geographic Names Information System. Accessed March 4, 2013.
  7. ^ a b c d e f DP-1 - Profile of General Population and Housing Characteristics: 2010 for Avon-by-the-Sea borough, Monmouth County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed July 29, 2012.
  8. ^ a b c d Municipalities Grouped by 2011-2020 Legislative Districts, New Jersey Department of State, p. 13. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  9. ^ a b c Profile of General Demographic Characteristics: 2010 for Avon-by-the-Sea borough, New Jersey Department of Labor and Workforce Development. Accessed July 29, 2012.
  10. ^ a b PEPANNRES - Annual Estimates of the Resident Population: April 1, 2010 to July 1, 2012 - 2012 Population Estimates for New Jersey municipalities, United States Census Bureau. Accessed July 7, 2013.
  11. ^ a b GCT-PH1 Population, Housing Units, Area, and Density: 2010 - State -- County Subdivision from the 2010 Census Summary File 1 for New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed December 11, 2012.
  12. ^ Look Up a ZIP Code for Avon-by-the-Sea, NJ, United States Postal Service. Accessed July 29, 2012.
  13. ^ Zip Codes, State of New Jersey. Accessed August 24, 2013.
  14. ^ Area Code Lookup - NPA NXX for Avon, NJ, Area-Codes.com. Accessed September 17, 2013.
  15. ^ a b "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  16. ^ A Cure for the Common Codes: New Jersey, Missouri Census Data Center. Accessed July 29, 2012.
  17. ^ "US Board on Geographic Names". United States Geological Survey. 2007-10-25. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  18. ^ Table 7. Population for the Counties and Municipalities in New Jersey: 1990, 2000 and 2010, New Jersey Department of Labor and Workforce Development, February 2011. Accessed July 29, 2012.
  19. ^ Martin, Patti. "Locals or bennies? Have them say, Aah-von; An oceanfront enclave with water on three sides, a wide Main Street with quirky shops, a Coast Guard station, drawbridges to the south, and a store famous for its macaroons.", Asbury Park Press, June 17, 2004. Accessed June 2, 2011. "All you need to do is ask them to pronounce the name of the small seaside community tucked between Belmar and Bradley Beach. Locals know it's Ahvon. Out-of-towners are more likely to say Avon.
  20. ^ Snyder, John P. The Story of New Jersey's Civil Boundaries: 1606-1968, Bureau of Geology and Topography; Trenton, New Jersey; 1969. p. 178. Accessed July 29, 2012.
  21. ^ Compendium of censuses 1726-1905: together with the tabulated returns of 1905, New Jersey Department of State, 1906. Accessed August 23, 2013.
  22. ^ Thirteenth Census of the United States, 1910: Population by Counties and Minor Civil Divisions, 1910, 1900, 1890, United States Census Bureau, p. 337. Accessed July 29, 2012.
  23. ^ Fifteenth Census of the United States : 1930 - Population Volume I, United States Census Bureau, p. 717. Accessed July 29, 2012.
  24. ^ New Jersey Resident Population by Municipality: 1930 - 1990, Workforce New Jersey Public Information Network, backed up by the Internet Archive as of May 2, 2009. Accessed July 29, 2012.
  25. ^ a b c d e Census 2000 Profiles of Demographic / Social / Economic / Housing Characteristics for Avon-by-the-Sea borough, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed July 29, 2012.
  26. ^ a b c d e DP-1: Profile of General Demographic Characteristics: 2000 - Census 2000 Summary File 1 (SF 1) 100-Percent Data for Avon-by-the-Sea borough, Monmouth County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed July 29, 2012.
  27. ^ DP03: Selected Economic Characteristics from the 2006-2010 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates for Avon-by-the-Sea borough, Monmouth County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed July 29, 2012.
  28. ^ Irish Communities, EPodunk. Accessed June 9, 2007.
  29. ^ The Commission Form of Municipal Government, p. 53. Accessed August 10, 2007.
  30. ^ Elected Officials, Avon-by-the-Sea Borough. Accessed August 24, 2013.
  31. ^ Welcome, Avon-by-the-Sea Borough. Accessed August 24, 2013. "Revenue and Finance should be directed to Mayor Robert Mahon; Public Affairs & Public Safety to Commissioner Frank Gorman; Public Works, Parks and Public Property to Commissioner Robert McGovern"
  32. ^ Plan Components Report, New Jersey Redistricting Commission, December 23, 2011. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  33. ^ 2012 New Jersey Citizen's Guide to Government, p. 54, New Jersey League of Women Voters. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  34. ^ Districts by Number for 2011-2020, New Jersey Legislature. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  35. ^ a b 2011 New Jersey Citizen's Guide to Government, p. 54, New Jersey League of Women Voters. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  36. ^ Directory of Representatives: New Jersey, United States House of Representatives. Accessed January 5, 2012.
  37. ^ Cory A. Booker, United States Senate. Accessed November 5, 2013.
  38. ^ Nutt, Amy Ellis (October 31, 2013). "Booker is officially a U.S. senator after being sworn in". NJ.com/Associated Press. Accessed October 31, 2013. "Former Newark Mayor Cory Booker was sworn in as a Democratic senator from New Jersey today, taking the oath of office, exchanging hugs with Vice President Joe Biden and acknowledging the applause of friends and family members seated in the visitor's gallery that rings the chamber.... Booker, 44, was elected to fill out the term of the late Sen. Frank Lautenberg, who died earlier this year."
  39. ^ Biography of Bob Menendez, United States Senate. Accessed November 5, 2013. "He currently lives in North Bergen and has two children, Alicia and Robert."
  40. ^ Senators of the 113th Congress from New Jersey. United States Senate. Accessed November 5, 2013.
  41. ^ Legislative Roster 2012-2013 Session, New Jersey Legislature. Accessed January 11, 2012.
  42. ^ "About the Governor". State of New Jersey. Retrieved 2010-01-21. 
  43. ^ "About the Lieutenant Governor". State of New Jersey. Retrieved 2010-01-21. 
  44. ^ Monmouth County Government, Monmouth County, New Jersey. Accessed February 4, 2014.
  45. ^ Freeholder Lillian G. Burry, Monmouth County, New Jersey. Accessed February 4, 2014.
  46. ^ Freeholder Gary J. Rich Sr., Monmouth County, New Jersey. Accessed February 4, 2014.
  47. ^ Freeholder Director Thomas A. Arnone, Monmouth County, New Jersey. Accessed February 4, 2014.
  48. ^ Freeholder John P. Curley, Monmouth County, New Jersey. Accessed February 4, 2014.
  49. ^ Freeholder Deputy Director Serena DiMaso, Monmouth County, New Jersey. Accessed February 4, 2014.
  50. ^ Freeholder Gary J. Rich Sr., Monmouth County, New Jersey. Accessed February 4, 2014.
  51. ^ About the County Clerk, M. Claire French, Monmouth County, New Jersey. Accessed February 4, 2014.
  52. ^ Sheriff Shaun Golden, Monmouth County Sheriff's Office. Accessed February 4, 2014.
  53. ^ Monmouth County Surrogate, Monmouth County, New Jersey. Accessed February 4, 2014.
  54. ^ Voter Registration Summary - Monmouth, New Jersey Department of State Division of Elections, March 23, 2011. Accessed December 3, 2012.
  55. ^ 2008 Presidential General Election Results: Monmouth County, New Jersey Department of State Division of Elections, December 23, 2008. Accessed December 3, 2012.
  56. ^ 2004 Presidential Election: Monmouth County, New Jersey Department of State Division of Elections, December 13, 2004. Accessed December 3, 2012.
  57. ^ 2009 Governor: Monmouth County, New Jersey Department of State Division of Elections, December 31, 2009. Accessed December 3, 2012.
  58. ^ Data for the Avon Elementary School, National Center for Education Statistics. Accessed December 3, 2012.
  59. ^ Boyd, Alesha Williams. "School districts likely to see overhaul", Asbury Park Press, January 18, 2009. Accessed October 2, 2013. "But Avon Board of Education President John Magrini said he expects that taxpayers in smaller districts would not benefit from regionalization. The 155 students in his K-8 district are sent to Manasquan and Asbury Park high schools through a lottery process after graduating from the elementary district."
  60. ^ Vellucci, Justin, "Judge to review Avon's school sending policy Hearings could be 4 to 6 months away", Asbury Park Press, July 23, 2004. Accessed October 2, 2013. "Under a policy approved in May, 62.5 percent of Avon high school students will be assigned to go to Manasquan this fall, while 37.5 percent will go to Asbury Park."
  61. ^ Manasquan Public Schools 2013 Report Card Narrative, New Jersey Department of Education. Accessed October 3, 2013. "Manasquan High School receives students from seven sending districts; Avon Belmar, Brielle, Lake Como, Sea Girt, Spring Lake and Spring Lake Heights, as well as our Manasquan Elementary students."
  62. ^ Sending Districts, Manasquan Public Schools. Accessed October 3, 2013. "Manasquan High School receives students from eight different districts; Avon, Bradley Beach, Brielle, Belmar, Lake Como, Sea Girt, Spring Lake, and Spring Lake Heights."
  63. ^ About, Monmouth County Vocational School District. Accessed October 3, 2013.
  64. ^ About Us, Academy Charter High School. Accessed October 3, 2013. "Academy Charter High School is a free public high school for residents of Allenhurst, Asbury Park, Avon, Belmar, Bradley Beach, Deal, Interlaken, and Lake Como."
  65. ^ Mullen, Shannon; Shields, Nancy; and Matheson, Kathy. "Crime, school solutions costly as city seeks rebirth; High school improving, but not enough, many say", Asbury Park Press, January 27, 2005. Accessed October 3, 2013. "It was the day of the charter school's annual lottery, when names of applicants are drawn at random to fill the last remaining slots in next fall's freshman class. Academy Charter, now in its seventh year, is free to students in Asbury Park and the seven nearby towns that are sending districts for Asbury Park High School: Allenhurst, Avon, Belmar, Bradley Beach, Deal, Interlaken and Lake Como, formerly South Belmar."

External links

Preceded by
Bradley Beach
Beaches of New Jersey Succeeded by
Belmar
Panoramio Photos